Pipilotti Rist

I'm a Victim of This Song, 1995
, 5 min 6 s, colour, sound

Courtesy of Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York

The Swiss artist Pipilotti Rist appropriates the song Wicked Game, by the American singer Chris
Isaak, and what was originally a romantic performance imitating the archetypal crooner style of the 1950s becomes a hallucinogenic fantasia in which images from his personal diary are combined with psychedelic colours that lead the music into the realm of dreams and memory. The song is performed by the artist herself with her voice with the collaboration of one of her sons, who at times distorts his voice to extremes of horror.

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Pipilotti Rist

Pipilotti Rist

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