Ana Laura Aláez

Superficiality, 2003
 Video, 6 min 26 s (music: Girls on Film*,
group formed by Cocó, Mario and Ana Laura) Courtesy of the artist

As the artist herself says, ‘One of the keenest polemics that crop up in artistic creation is the confrontation between what is superficial and what is supposedly transcendental. The world of ideas is conventionally identified with abstraction rather than literality; the banal with first-person stories, the mark of the artist, the confessional and formal beauty. On the subject of gender, we might also say that society has throughout history labelled women as superficial on account of their need to express themselves through their attire. There are still doubts about incompatibility between aesthetics and the profound...)’.

Superficiality is a video which is not limited to the music/image rhythm that can be achieved in a music video but goes on and overflows the aesthetic resolution of video-art. In it Aláez uses one of her most recurrent icons: the bust or head as the most expressive and sculptural part of the body, and make-up as a taboo in art, where a sensuality is revealed that supposedly prevails over the conceptual or metaphysical.

*Cocó and Mario (Ex - Silvania y Cielo) joined Ana Laura to make an electronic music album under the name Girls on Film, as a tribute to the song by Duran Duran.

Horizon, 2005
Video 5 min 48 s (music: Ascii.Disko)
Courtesy of the artist

In 2005 the artist was invited to take part in a pilot TV programme on contemporary art. The original idea was to interview her in her studio. She suggested changing this cliché, which takes it for granted that every artist is connected to a material studio, and suggested that the interview should consist of the production of a music video written and directed by herself. The film material was made into two: on one hand, an action interspersed with an interview, which is what was broadcast on television, and on the other this video as the backing for a pop song with the title Horizon. It was filmed in Madrid in one of the Kio Towers by Philip Johnson. For that reason it has a certain touch of time and place. The music is by Ascii.Disko. It talks about the mark left by a lover on leaving the room. And it’s raining. And he stays in bed holding onto her scent. Dreaming that from now on everything will work out. That love can be a horizon. That it can be real.

Joseph Beuys

Joseph Beuys

Dara Birnbaum

Dara Birnbaum

John Sanborn, Kit Fitzgerald (Antarctica)

John Sanborn, Kit Fitzgerald (Antarctica)

Pipilotti Rist

Pipilotti Rist

Bjørn Melhus

Bjørn Melhus

Charley Case

Charley Case

Olaf Breuning

Olaf Breuning

Cheryl Donegan

Cheryl Donegan

Ana Laura Aláez

Ana Laura Aláez

Marc Bijl

Marc Bijl

Carles Congost

Carles Congost

Joan Morey

Joan Morey

 Adel Abidin

Adel Abidin

Hugo Alonso

Hugo Alonso

Charles Atlas

Charles Atlas

Jesús Hernández

Jesús Hernández

César Pesquera

César Pesquera

Jorge Galindo and Santiago Sierra

Jorge Galindo and Santiago Sierra

Serpent Head

Serpent Head

The Greek god Apollo and his son Asklepios presided over the realm of medicine and healing. Apollo was also the god of light and sun, whose solar symbolism and association with medicine would become linked to Christ the Physician, and the resurrected.

Return from Vienna

Return from Vienna

Józef Brandt harboured a fascination for the history of 17th century Poland, and his favourite themes included ballistic scenes and genre scenes before and after the battle proper –all and sundry marches, returns, supply trains, billets and encampments, patrols, and similar motifs illustrating the drudgery of warfare outside of its culminating moments.

Niko Pirosmani

Niko Pirosmani

“A nameless Egyptian fresco, an African idol or a vase from Crete: we should behold Pirosmani’s art among them. Only this way it is possible to conceive it genuinely … …You see Pirosmani – you believe in Georgia”.
Grigol Robakidze