Stalker

  • December 17, 2016 / 16:00
  • December 18, 2016 / 17:00

Director: Andrei Tarkovsky
Cast: Alisa Freyndlikh, Aleksandr Kaydanovskiy, Anatoliy Solonitsyn
Soviet Union, 1979, 163’, color, black & white

Russian with Turkish subtitles

While Solaris is considered the pinnacle of Tarkovsky's engagement with the fantastical, Stalker has its many defendants. Arguably the most accessible of Tarkovsky's films, this philosophical fable employs the roughest outlines of a novel by Soviet sci-fi writers Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. A mysterious Zone is said to contain a room that grants wishes; the Stalker will take you there for a fee, past military checkpoints and more obscure dangers. A clear imprint of this terse, laconic film is still felt in such apocalyptic hits as 28 Days Later. - by Robert Skotak

Ivan's Childhood

Ivan's Childhood

Andrei Rublev

Andrei Rublev

Solaris

Solaris

The Mirror

The Mirror

Stalker

Stalker

Nostalgia

Nostalgia

Voyage In Time

Voyage In Time

Sacrifice

Sacrifice

One Day In the Life of Andrei Arsenevich

One Day In the Life of Andrei Arsenevich

Trailer

Stalker

Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel

Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel

In 1998 Ben Jakober and Yannick Vu collaborated on an obvious remake of Marcel Duchamp’s Roue de Bicyclette, his first “readymade” object. Duchamp combined a bicycle wheel, a fork and a stool to create a machine which served no purpose, subverting accepted norms of art. 

Good News from the Skies

Good News from the Skies

Inspired by the exhibition And Now the Good News, which focusing on the relationship between mass media and art, we prepared horoscope readings based on the chapters of the exhibition. Using the popular astrological language inspired by the effects of the movements of celestial bodies on people, these readings with references to the works in the exhibition make fictional future predictions inspired by the horoscope columns that we read in the newspapers with the desire to receive good news about our day. 

Symbols

Symbols

Pera Museum’s Cold Front from the Balkans exhibition curated by Ali Akay and Alenka Gregorič brings together contemporary artists from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Slovenia.