One Day In the Life of Andrei Arsenevich

  • December 29, 2016 / 19:00
  • December 31, 2016 / 14:00

Director: Chris Marker
France, 1999, 55’, color

Russian, French, English with Turkish subtitles

Through film clips, journal entries, and personal musings, One Day In the Life of Andrei Arsenevich is renowned French filmmaker Chris Marker's homage to his friend and colleague, Andrei Tarkovsky, who died in 1986. Through close readings of Tarkovsky's films - including rare scenes from his student film and a practically unknown production of Boris Goudonov - Marker attempts to locate Tarkovsky in his work. Parallels drawn by Marker between Tarkovksy's life and films offer an original insight into the reclusive director. With behind-the-scenes footage of Tarkovsky obsessively commanding his entire, and candid moments of Tarkovsky with his friends and family, bedridden but still working on the editing of his final film, this is a personal and loving portrait of the monumental filmmaker.

This film will be screened after "Voyage In Time".

Ivan's Childhood

Ivan's Childhood

Andrei Rublev

Andrei Rublev

Solaris

Solaris

The Mirror

The Mirror

Stalker

Stalker

Nostalgia

Nostalgia

Voyage In Time

Voyage In Time

Sacrifice

Sacrifice

One Day In the Life of Andrei Arsenevich

One Day In the Life of Andrei Arsenevich

Trailer

One Day In the Life of Andrei Arsenevich

Il Cavallo di Leonardo

Il Cavallo di Leonardo

In 1493, exactly 500 years ago, Leonardo da Vinci was finishing the preparations for casting the equestrian monument (4 times life size), which Ludovico il Moro, Duke of Milan commissioned in memory of his father some 12 years earlier. 

Good News from the Skies

Good News from the Skies

Inspired by the exhibition And Now the Good News, which focusing on the relationship between mass media and art, we prepared horoscope readings based on the chapters of the exhibition. Using the popular astrological language inspired by the effects of the movements of celestial bodies on people, these readings with references to the works in the exhibition make fictional future predictions inspired by the horoscope columns that we read in the newspapers with the desire to receive good news about our day. 

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.