I Vitelloni

  • May 3, 2014 / 14:00
  • May 11, 2014 / 16:00

Director: Federico Fellini
Cast: Franco Interlenghi, Alberto Sordi, Franco Fabrizi
Italy, France 92’, 1956, black & white

Italian with Turkish subtitles

Five young men linger in a post-adolescent limbo, dreaming of adventure and escape from their small seacoast town. They while away time spending the lira doled out by their indulgent families on drink, women, and nights at the local pool hall. Fellini’s second film is a semiautobiographical masterpiece of sharply drawn character sketches: Skirt chaser Fausto, forced to marry a girl he has impregnated; Alberto, the perpetual child; Leopoldo, a writer thirsting for fame; and Moraldo, the only member of the group troubled by a moral conscience. An international success and recipient of an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay, I Vitelloni compassionately details a year in the life of a group of small-town lay-abouts struggling to find meaning in their lives.

Rome, Open City

Rome, Open City

Paisan

Paisan

Germany Year Zero

Germany Year Zero

Stromboli

Stromboli

Umberto D

Umberto D

Bread, Love and Dreams

Bread, Love and Dreams

I Vitelloni

I Vitelloni

Journey to Italy

Journey to Italy

Banditi a Orgosolo

Banditi a Orgosolo

Cesare Zavattini

Cesare Zavattini

History of Italian Cinema

History of Italian Cinema

Trailer

I Vitelloni

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Martín Zapater y Clavería, born in Zaragoza on November 12th 1747, came from a family of modest merchants and was taken in to live with a well-to-do aunt, Juana Faguás, and her daughter, Joaquina de Alduy. He studied with Goya in the Escuelas Pías school in Zaragoza from 1752 to 1757 and a friendship arose between them which was to last until the death of Zapater in 1803. 

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Cindy Sherman Look At Me!

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