Valerie and Her Week of Wonders

  • November 3, 2017 / 21:00
  • November 19, 2017 / 17:00

Director: Jaromil Jires
Cast: Jaroslava Schallerová, Helena Anýzová, Petr Kopriva, Jirí Prýmek
Czechoslovakia, 1970, 77', color
Czech with Turkish subtitles
 

A girl on the verge of womanhood finds herself in a sensual fantasyland of vampires, witchcraft, and other threats in this eerie and mystical movie daydream. Based on a novel by the poet Vítězslav Nezval, the film serves up an endlessly looping, nonlinear fairy tale, set in a quasi-medieval landscape. Ravishingly shot, enchantingly scored, and spilling over with surreal fancies, this enticing phantasmagoria from director Jaromil Jireš is among the most beautiful oddities of the Czechoslovak New Wave.

Valerie and Her Week of Wonders

Valerie and Her Week of Wonders

Rabid

Rabid

Near Dark

Near Dark

Cronos

Cronos

Let the Right One In

Let the Right One In

Byzantium

Byzantium

Only Lovers Left Alive

Only Lovers Left Alive

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

What We Do in the Shadows

What We Do in the Shadows

The Lure

The Lure

The Transfiguration

The Transfiguration

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