Room 237

  • February 28, 2015 / 19:00
  • March 8, 2015 / 18:00

Director: Rodney Ascher
Cast: Bill Blakemore, Geoffrey Cocks, Juli Kearns
USA, 102’, 2012, color

English with Turkish subtitles

A subjective documentary exploring the numerous theories about the hidden meanings in Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining (1980). The film may be over 30 years old but it continues to inspire debate, speculation, and mystery. Five very different points of view are illuminated through voice over, film clips, animation and dramatic reenactments. Together they’ll draw the audience into a new maze, one with endless detours and dead ends, many ways in, but no way out.

Contempt

Contempt

Bardot, la Méprise

Bardot, la Méprise

Inferno

Inferno

Free Radicals: A History of Experimental Film

Free Radicals: A History of Experimental Film

Beaches of Agnès

Beaches of Agnès

A Trip to the Moon

A Trip to the Moon

The Extraordinary Voyage

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Room 237

Room 237

This Film Is Not Yet Rated

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The Pervert's Guide To Cinema

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Be Kind Rewind

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Trailer

Room 237

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“The portrait tells us that there is an inner and an outer dimension of the human condition; it provides—or should provide—information about both the physical and psychological character of an individual.” 

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When regarding the paintings of Istanbul by western painters, Golden Horn has a distinctive place and value. This body of water that separates the Topkapı Palace and the Historical Peninsula, in which monumental edifices are located, from Galata, where westerners and foreign embassies dwell, is as though an interpenetrating boundary.

Midnight Stories: The Soul <br> Aşkın Güngör

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Aşkın Güngör

The wind blows, rubbing against my legs made of layers of metal and wires, swaying the leaves of grass that have shot up from the cracks in the tarmac, and going off to the windows that look like the eyes of dead children in the wrecked buildings that seem to be everywhere as far as the eye can see.