L’Atalante

  • October 26, 2016 / 19:00

Director: Jean Vigo
Cast: Michel Simon, Dita Parlo, Jean Dasté, Gilles Margaritis, Louis Lefebvre, Raphaël Diligent
France, 1934, 89’, black & white; French with Turkish subtitles 

Imagine a film directed from a deathbed, with the director dying shortly after the premier. That’s L’Atalante (eponymous with a character from Greek mythology); it is also one of the most important films of the history of cinema with its poeticism, which also inspired Emir Kusturica’s Underground. In order to break free of life’s monotony, Juliette marries Jean, who operates a steamboat. Old Père Jules makes life on the steamboat particularly difficult. Egged on by a peddler, Juliette runs off to discover Paris. Her husband first gets mad at her, then leaves her, and finally ends up in depression. After a while, Père Jules goes after Juliette, finds her, and together they return to the steamboat.

Battleship Potemkin

Battleship Potemkin

Le Mépris

Le Mépris

Rocco and His Brothers

Rocco and His Brothers

Hiroshima mon amour

Hiroshima mon amour

L’Atalante

L’Atalante

Hope

Hope

The Conformist

The Conformist

Bride

Bride

Persona

Persona

Metropolis

Metropolis

The Mirror

The Mirror

8 ½

8 ½

Salvatore Giuliano

Salvatore Giuliano

Trailer

L’Atalante

Girl in a Blue Dress

Girl in a Blue Dress

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Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

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Chlebowski’s Sultan

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