Persona

  • December 14, 2016 / 19:00

Director: Ingmar Bergman
Cast: Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook,  Gunnar Björnstra, Jörgen Lindström
Sweden, 1966, 84’, black & white, Swedish with Turkish subtitles 

Elisabet Vogler, the famous actress, suddenly falls silent during a performance of Electra one night, and never speaks again. She is first treated at a clinic, after which her doctor sends her away to the seaside, accompanied by a nurse, so that she can get some rest. The two women become friends. Elisabet’s silence moves Alma to open up and talk about herself. However, when it is revealed that Elisabet has reported her confessions to the doctor in a letter, a deep crisis ensues between the two. Regarding this film, Bergman said, “I believe I have gone as far as I could with Persona. I feel I have touched upon secrets that only cinema can reveal, in great freedom and without using words.” The film is ranked 17th among the best films of all times.

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