The Headless Woman

  • September 17, 2017 / 15:00
  • October 6, 2017 / 19:00

Director: Lucrecia Martel
Cast: María Onetto, Claudia Cantero, Inés Efron, César Bordón, Daniel Genoud, Guillermo Arengo, Mará Vaner
Argentina, France, Italy, Spain, 2008, 87’, color
Spanish with Turkish subtitles

On this deserted road in Argentina, it is hard to see anyone other than the poor boys and dogs playing. On the other hand, Veronica is quite confident that she passed from that road in her car, but has no idea if the thing she hit was a boy or a dog. Instead of stopping for help, she goes on her way, stopping by the hospital for an x-ray and spending the night at a hotel. She says she was in shock. When she gets back to normal, she decides to return to the road and check the newspapers. But how about the records in the hospital and the hotel? The Headless Woman tells the mental disturbance of a middle-aged, middle class woman who deals with the burden of a crime, although she is not sure if she has committed it.

Carancho

Carancho

Nine Queens

Nine Queens

The Aura

The Aura

Kóblic

Kóblic

The Man Next Door

The Man Next Door

The Secret in Their Eyes

The Secret in Their Eyes

Clandestine Childhood

Clandestine Childhood

Eva Doesn’t Sleep

Eva Doesn’t Sleep

Wild Tales

Wild Tales

The Headless Woman

The Headless Woman

Trailer

The Headless Woman

Giorgio de Chirico

Giorgio de Chirico

Giorgio de Chirico was born on July 10, 1888, in Volos, Greece, to an Italian family. His mother, Gemma Cervetto, was from a family of Genoa origin, but most likely she was born in Izmir. His father, Evaristo, was born on June 21, 1841 in the Büyükdere district of Istanbul.

Il Cavallo di Leonardo

Il Cavallo di Leonardo

In 1493, exactly 500 years ago, Leonardo da Vinci was finishing the preparations for casting the equestrian monument (4 times life size), which Ludovico il Moro, Duke of Milan commissioned in memory of his father some 12 years earlier. 

Good News from the Skies

Good News from the Skies

Inspired by the exhibition And Now the Good News, which focusing on the relationship between mass media and art, we prepared horoscope readings based on the chapters of the exhibition. Using the popular astrological language inspired by the effects of the movements of celestial bodies on people, these readings with references to the works in the exhibition make fictional future predictions inspired by the horoscope columns that we read in the newspapers with the desire to receive good news about our day.