King of the Belgians

  • January 20, 2017 / 21:00
  • January 25, 2017 / 19:00

Director: Peter Brosens, Jessica Woodworth
Cast: Peter Van den Begin, Lucie Debay, Titus De Voogdt, Bruno Georis
Belgium, Netherlands, Bulgaria, 2016, 94’, color
English, Flemish, French and Bulgarian with Turkish subtitles

Road films usually dwell on the self-discovery stories of characters who have been lost or underdogs all their lives. But King of the Belgians is a bit different… Our protagonist, who is lost in the Balkans is His-Majesty the King of Belgium! King Nicholas III is informed that Wallonia has declared independence during his official visit to Istanbul and he is determined to go back to his country and save his kingdom. He has a lot to confront though; a solar storm, idle devices and crazy people he meets on the road. Presented as a mockumentary, this great comedy is directed by the creative duo behind The Fifth Season, Peter Brosens and Jessica Woodworth.

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Trailer

King of the Belgians

Il Cavallo di Leonardo

Il Cavallo di Leonardo

In 1493, exactly 500 years ago, Leonardo da Vinci was finishing the preparations for casting the equestrian monument (4 times life size), which Ludovico il Moro, Duke of Milan commissioned in memory of his father some 12 years earlier. 

Turquerie

Turquerie

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The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

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