Exit Through the Gift Shop

  • September 26, 2014 / 20:00
  • September 28, 2014 / 18:00

Banksy, UK, 87’, 2010,
English with Turkish subtitles

This is the inside story of street art - a brutal and revealing account of what happens when fame, money and vandalism collide. Exit Through the Gift Shop follows an eccentric shop-keeper turned amateur film-maker as he attempts to capture many of the world’s most infamous vandals on camera, only to have a British stencil artist named Banksy turn the camcorder back on its owner with wildly unexpected results. One of the most provocative films about art ever made, it is a fascinating study of low-level criminality, comradeship and incompetence. By turns shocking, hilarious and absurd, this is an enthralling modern-day fairytale... with bolt cutters.

This Screening is supported by British Council



Screenings can be seen with a discounted museum ticket (8 TL). No reservations taken.

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Bomb It 2

Bomb It 2

Exit Through  the Gift Shop

Exit Through the Gift Shop

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Don’t Expect Too Much

Don’t Expect Too Much

Trailer

Exit Through the Gift Shop

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Return from Vienna

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The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

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