The Asthenic Syndrome

  • March 9, 2016 / 19:00
  • March 19, 2016 / 14:00
  • March 26, 2016 / 18:00

Director: Kira Muratova
Cast: Olga Antonova, Sergei Popov, Galina Zakhurdaeva
Soviet Union, 1990, 153’, color, black & white
Russian with Turkish subtitles

"My country had reached bankruptcy and there was nowhere else for it to go.
Everything had to burst!"
Kira Muratova

 

 

Muratova's impressionistic portrait of the USSR reaching the end of its tether is for many the most powerful single achievement of the glasnost cinema. It was initially held up for distribution but then finally released and went on to win the Silver Bear at the 1990 Berlin Film Festival. The film begins with a story, shot in black and white, of a woman soon after the death of her husband. Yet what troubles her is not only his death; something larger, much darker and more powerful, is brewing inside her. Then one day it happens: it all comes out as she's riding a public bus. Her diatribe is astonishing - but then we discover that this has all been an introduction to the "real" film that Muratova wants to make. Mixing documentary, farce, melodrama, black comedy, social problem picture and psychological portrait - along with a few other elements - The Asthenic Syndrome is a unique, one-of-a-kind film, an epic yet deeply personal response to Soviet life and history.

Brief Encounters

Brief Encounters

Passions

Passions

The Asthenic Syndrome

The Asthenic Syndrome

The Tuner

The Tuner

Three Stories

Three Stories

Chekhov's Motifs

Chekhov's Motifs

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Martín Zapater y Clavería, born in Zaragoza on November 12th 1747, came from a family of modest merchants and was taken in to live with a well-to-do aunt, Juana Faguás, and her daughter, Joaquina de Alduy. He studied with Goya in the Escuelas Pías school in Zaragoza from 1752 to 1757 and a friendship arose between them which was to last until the death of Zapater in 1803. 

Return from Vienna

Return from Vienna

Józef Brandt harboured a fascination for the history of 17th century Poland, and his favourite themes included ballistic scenes and genre scenes before and after the battle proper –all and sundry marches, returns, supply trains, billets and encampments, patrols, and similar motifs illustrating the drudgery of warfare outside of its culminating moments.

Midnight Horror Stories: The Landlord

Midnight Horror Stories: The Landlord

Three people sleeping side by side. On the uncomfortable seats of the stuffy airplane in the air. Three friends. I’m the friend in the window seat. The other two are a couple, Emre and Melisa. I’m alone, they are together. And another difference. I’ve only closed my eyes. They are asleep.