Kira Muratova
Love Eclipsed

March 5 - March 27, 2016

Kira Muratova (b. 1934, Soroki, Moldova) is both a living legend and one of the most marginalized figures in Russian cinema. During the Soviet era her work failed to conform to ideological requirements, and today it doesn’t correspond with commercial trends – in the past, her films were locked away in the censor’s vault. Over the past 55 years she has made 20 films, each of which betrays a different aesthetic and a unique ability to articulate the most fundamental qualities of society. A prime example is Muratova’s masterpiece, The Asthenic Syndrome.

One can cite very few filmmakers whose life could so easily be made into the basis for a remarkable motion picture, but in her seventy years Kira Muratova has experienced extraordinary tragedies and triumphs, both personal and professional, while creating one of the essential filmographies of postwar Soviet/Russian cinema. Born in what is now the Republic of Moldova, Muratova in the early 60s fell in with the emerging generation of young filmmakers transforming Soviet cinema. Her first feature, Brief Encounters, a fascinating portrait of a casual love triangle in a ramshackle Soviet town, proved too honest for the authorities. With her second feature, Long Farewells, she passed into legend. The Soviet cultural thaw then over, the film was banned and Muratova was expelled from the Filmmakers' Union. The film's lead actress hid a print under her bed, fearful the negative would be destroyed. Eventually the cultural winds shifted and with glasnost Muratova was discovered by a new generation. In 1987, for the first time, her films were screened outside he Soviet Union and acclaimed as masterworks. Yet she continued to rankle the powers that be: The Asthenic Syndrome, made in 1989 and for many the era's most important film, was the only Soviet film banned (for a few months) under Mikhail Gorbachev. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Muratova's vision of the world remains as penetrating and harsh as ever. If she could be said to have a spiritual ancestor in the cinema, it would be Erich von Stroheim. Like Stroheim, she coolly presents everyday cruelty without sensationalism or moralizing. For Muratova, one must see the world for what it is before one can decide how to act; her films detail the stripping away of her characters' illusions. - Richard Pena


in collaboration

March 5

19:00 Brief Encounters

March 6

14:00 Passions

17:00 The Tuner

March 8

19:00 Passions

March 9

19:00 The Asthenic Syndrome

March 11

18:00 Brief Encounters

20:00 The Tuner

March 13

14:00 Chekhov's Motifs

16:00 Three Stories

March 19

14:00 The Asthenic Syndrome

17:00 Three Stories

March 26

18:00 The Asthenic Syndrome

March 27

15:00 Three Stories

Brief Encounters

Brief Encounters

Passions

Passions

The Asthenic Syndrome

The Asthenic Syndrome

The Tuner

The Tuner

Three Stories

Three Stories

Chekhov's Motifs

Chekhov's Motifs

Program Trailer

Kira Muratova
Love Eclipsed

Kira Muratova (b. 1934, Soroki, Moldova) is both a living legend and one of the most marginalized figures in Russian cinema. During the Soviet era her work failed to conform to ideological requirements, and today it doesn’t correspond with commercial trends – in the past, her films were locked away in the censor’s vault.

Midnight Stories: Hotel of Retro Dreams <br> Doğu Yücel

Midnight Stories: Hotel of Retro Dreams
Doğu Yücel

He didn’t expect this from me. And I hadn’t expected that we would decide to get married that day, at that moment. Everything happened all of a sudden, but exactly like it was supposed to happen in our day. We thought of the idea of marriage simultaneously, we smiled simultaneously, blinking and opening our eyes in unison. 

The First Nudes

The First Nudes

Men were the first nudes in Turkish painting. The majority of these paintings were academic studies executed in oil paint; they were part of the education of artists that had finally attained the opportunity to work from the live model. The gender of the models constituted an obstacle in the way of characterizing these paintings as ‘nudes’. 

From Cypresses to Turkish Landscapes

From Cypresses to Turkish Landscapes

Among the most interesting themes in the oeuvre of Prassinos are cypresses, trees, and Turkish landscapes. The cypress woods in Üsküdar he saw every time he stepped out on the terrace of their house in İstanbul or the trees in Petits Champs must have been strong images of childhood for Prassinos.