Ta’ang

  • April 5, 2017 / 16:00
  • April 9, 2017 / 16:00

Director: Wang Bing
Hong Kong, France 2016, 147’, color
Ta’ang language; with Turkish and English subtitles

A civil war has been raging for decades in Myanmar’s Kokang region, which is home to the Ta’ang people. When their lives are once again in danger in spring 2015, it is mostly the women and children who flee over the border to China. Wang Bing accompanies a few of these communities thrown together by fate, at once modern and bound to traditions. They wander the remote mountains with few possessions, and camp in makeshift compounds, telling each other stories by the campfire at night. Wang Bing presents us with a picture of a refugee crisis that has received very little attention in the rest of the world.

Ta’ang

Ta’ang

In Vanda’s Room

In Vanda’s Room

Neighboring Sounds

Neighboring Sounds

The White Ribbon

The White Ribbon

40 Days of Silence

40 Days of Silence

The Apple

The Apple

Youkali

Youkali

Toponymy

Toponymy

What Now? Remind Me

What Now? Remind Me

Dogville

Dogville

a good neighbor Shorts

a good neighbor Shorts

Janine Antoni Look At Me!

Janine Antoni Look At Me!

The exhibition Look at Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection examines portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Through the exhibition we will be sharing about the artists and sections in Look At Me!. This time we are sharing about Janine Antoni , exhibited under the section “The Conventions of Identitiy”!

Doublethinking About Big Brother! <br> 11 Quotes from 1984

Doublethinking About Big Brother!
11 Quotes from 1984

Our Doublethink Double vision exhibition’s title alludes to George Orwell’s seminal work 1984 and presents a selection that includes Tracey Emin, Marcel Dzama, Anselm Kiefer, Bruce Nauman, Raymond Pettibon, and Thomas Ruff, as well as Turkish artists, tracing the steps of pluralistic thought through works of art.

Midnight Stories: COGITO <br> Tevfik Uyar

Midnight Stories: COGITO
Tevfik Uyar

He had imagined the court room as a big place. It wasn’t. It was about the size of his living room, with an elevation at one end, with a dais on it. The judges and the attorneys sat there. Below it was an old wooden rail, worn out in some places. That was his place. There was another seat for his lawyer. At the back, about 20 or 30 chairs were stowed out for the non-existent crowd.