Innocent Sorcerers

  • February 15, 2014 / 18:00
  • February 19, 2014 / 19:00

Director: Andrzej Wajda
Cast: Tadeusz Lomnicki, Krystyna Stypulkowska, Wanda Koczeska
Poland, 87’, 1960, black and white

Polish with Turkish subtitles

Working with a screenplay by Jerzy Andrzejewski (Ashes and Diamonds) and a very young Jerzy Skolimowski (who appears as a boxer in the film), Wajda chronicles a soft bohemia made up of motor scooters, easy flirtations and jazz enjoyed by a group of Warsaw 20-somethings. Bazyli (Tadeusz Lomnicki), a recent graduate from medical school, is more dedicated to playing drums than to pursuing his profession. Fellow hipster Edmund (Zbigniew Cybulski) asks Bazyli’s help in attracting the attention of a beautiful young woman, but it’s Bazyli who winds up walking her to the train station, after the last train has already departed…Innocent Sorcerers brilliantly captures the post-Stalin thaw that had begun to sweep through the Eastern bloc countries by the late ’50s while meditating on the pleasures and terror that freedom can bring. 

Canal

Canal

Ashes and Diamonds

Ashes and Diamonds

Night Train

Night Train

Mother Joan of the Angels

Mother Joan of the Angels

Innocent Sorcerers

Innocent Sorcerers

Knife in the Water

Knife in the Water

The Saragossa Manuscript

The Saragossa Manuscript

Trailer

Innocent Sorcerers

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