Canal

  • February 13, 2014 / 19:00
  • February 15, 2014 / 14:00

Director: Andrzej Wajda
Cast: Teresa Izewska, Tadeusz Janczar, Wienczyslaw Glinski,Tadeusz Gwiazdowski, Stanislaw Mikulski
Poland, 96’, 1957, black and white

Polish with Turkish subtitles

An unforgettably vivid depiction of the last days of the 1944 Warsaw uprising against the German Nazis, Kanal was co-awarded (with The Seventh Seal) a special jury prize at the 1957 Cannes Film Festival, establishing Wajda as a major new international film talent. His second film – and the second part of his war trilogy – features a rich mosaic of meticulously combined narratives, following a band of surviving Polish Home Army soldiers that takes to the sewers to avoid capture. Unable to allude to the fact that the Soviet Army was waiting just across the river while the Germans wiped out the non-Communist resistance, Wajda portrayed the insurgents with unaccustomed sympathy.

Canal

Canal

Ashes and Diamonds

Ashes and Diamonds

Night Train

Night Train

Mother Joan of the Angels

Mother Joan of the Angels

Innocent Sorcerers

Innocent Sorcerers

Knife in the Water

Knife in the Water

The Saragossa Manuscript

The Saragossa Manuscript

The Conventions of Identity

The Conventions of Identity

The exhibition “Look At Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection” examined portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Paintings, photographs, sculptures and videos shaped a labyrinth of gazes that invite spectators to reflect themselves in the social mirror of portraits.

Midnight Stories: COGITO <br> Tevfik Uyar

Midnight Stories: COGITO
Tevfik Uyar

He had imagined the court room as a big place. It wasn’t. It was about the size of his living room, with an elevation at one end, with a dais on it. The judges and the attorneys sat there. Below it was an old wooden rail, worn out in some places. That was his place. There was another seat for his lawyer. At the back, about 20 or 30 chairs were stowed out for the non-existent crowd.

Giacometti’s Final Works

Giacometti’s Final Works

Giacometti was selected for three important retrospectives at the New York Museum of Modern Art, the Tate Gallery in London and the Louisiana Museum of Art in Denmark, all of which were a great success.