Accattone

  • November 4, 2015 / 19:00
  • November 11, 2015 / 19:00

Director: Pier Paolo Pasolini
Cast: Franco Citti, Franca Pasut, Silvana Corsini
Italy, 120’, 1961, black & white

Italian with Turkish subtitles 

The first of Pier Paolo Pasolini's highly acclaimed films and the winner of numerous film festival prizes, Accattone uses a talented cast to present a vivid picture of the Roman slums. Based on one of the filmmaker/poet's novels, this story of a pimp, his friends, his enemies and his girls is realism at its earthiness. It is brutal, realistic, un-sentimental and bustling with life. Particularly effective is the use of Johann Sebastian Bach on the soundtrack, which provides the ironic counterpoint of the world of prostitutes and street fighters.

Accattone

Accattone

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Trailer

Accattone

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