Identification of a Woman

Director:  Michelangelo Antonioni
Cast: Tomas Milian, Daniela Silverio, Christine Boisson
Italy, France, 128’, 1982, color
Italian, French, English with Turkish subtitles

“I don’t know the story yet, but the main character is a woman,” claims the disoriented film director in Antonioni’s last Italian-set inquiry into the imprecise nature of human relationships. The film is a body- and soul-baring voyage into one man’s artistic and erotic consciousness. After his wife leaves him, a film director finds himself drawn into affairs with two enigmatic women: at the same time, he searches for the right subject and actress for his next film. This spellbinding anti-romance was a late-career coup for the legendary Italian filmmaker, and is renowned for its sexual explicitness and an extended scene on a fog-enshrouded highway that stands with the director’s greatest set pieces.

Story of a Love Affair

Story of a Love Affair

Red Desert

Red Desert

Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point

Identification of a Woman

Identification of a Woman

L’Avventura

L’Avventura

Blow-Up

Blow-Up

The Mystery of Oberwald

The Mystery of Oberwald

Shorts

Shorts

“My body is my sculpture” <br> Louise Bourgeois

“My body is my sculpture”
Louise Bourgeois

Pera Museum, in collaboration with Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV), is one of the main venues for this year’s 15th Istanbul Biennial from 16 September to 12 November 2017. Through the biennial, we will be sharing detailed information about the artists and the artworks. 

Midnight Stories: The Soul

Midnight Stories: The Soul

Pera Museum Blog has published a series of “Techno – Dystopia” stories in collaboration with Turkey’s Fantasy and Science Fiction Arts Association (FABISAD). The Association’s member writers shared these newly commissioned short stories inspired by the artworks of Katherine Behar as part of the Museum’s Data’s Entry exhibition.

Audience with the Mad King

Audience with the Mad King

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, Pera Museum invites artist Benoît Hamet to reinterpret key pieces from its collections, casting a humourous eye over ‘historical’ events, both imagined and factual.