Pera Museum

Coffee and Cigarettes

  • January 17, 2015 / 18:00
  • February 1, 2015 / 17:00

Director: Jim Jarmusch
Cast: Roberto Benigni, Steve Buscemi, Iggy Pop, Tom Waits, Cate Blanchett, Bill Murray
USA, Japan, Italy; 95’, 2003, black and white
English and French with Turkish subtitles

Celebrated writer-director Jim Jarmusch serves up this witty and intoxicating brew that's "as addictive as caffeine" (Richard Roeper, "Ebert & Roeper and the Movies") and "as buzzy and ephemeral as, well, coffee and cigarettes" (LA Weekly)! "Sneakily delirious [and] way cool" (Time), this "funny cluster of eleven stories" (Rolling Stone) delivers "inspired eccentric match-ups" (The Hollywood Reporter) from an incredible all-star cast, making Coffee and Cigarettes an absolute must for fans of film, fun and fantastic wit!

 

Coffee and Cigarettes

Coffee and Cigarettes

A Film About Coffee

A Film About Coffee

Coffee: Between Reality and Imagination

Coffee: Between Reality and Imagination

Hot Coffee

Hot Coffee

Straight to Hell

Straight to Hell

Smoke

Smoke

Blue in the Face

Blue in the Face

Inside Llewyn Davis

Inside Llewyn Davis

Coffee Futures

Coffee Futures

A Cup of Turkish Coffee

A Cup of Turkish Coffee

Trailer

Coffee and Cigarettes

Midnight Stories: The Soul <br> Aşkın Güngör

Midnight Stories: The Soul
Aşkın Güngör

The wind blows, rubbing against my legs made of layers of metal and wires, swaying the leaves of grass that have shot up from the cracks in the tarmac, and going off to the windows that look like the eyes of dead children in the wrecked buildings that seem to be everywhere as far as the eye can see.

Girl in a Blue Dress

Girl in a Blue Dress

This life-size portrait of a girl is a fine example of the British art of portrait painting in the early 18th century. The child is shown posing on a terrace, which is enclosed at the right foreground by the plinth of a pillar; the background is mainly filled with trees and shrubs. 

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

“The portrait tells us that there is an inner and an outer dimension of the human condition; it provides—or should provide—information about both the physical and psychological character of an individual.”