A Cup of Turkish Coffee

  • January 30, 2015 / 18:00
  • January 31, 2015 / 13:00

Directors: Nazlı Eda Noyan & Dağhan Celayir
France, Turkey; 8’, 2013, color
Turkish with English subtitles

An old woman and her granddaughter sit around a table and go through old family photographs. Although this old woman, at first, tries to resist looking at these pictures, she cannot resist what the past evokes. During the time it takes to drink one cup of Turkish coffee we witness the story of a little girl who hung on to life and captured happiness, although she was forced to get married at a young age. These old family photographs are transformed by the old woman's feelings of the past while her granddaughter and a cup of Turkish coffee tie her to the present.

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