A Film About Coffee

  • January 14, 2015 / 19:00
  • January 16, 2015 / 19:00

Director: Brandon Loper
USA; 67’, 2014, color
English with Turkish subtitles

A Film About Coffee is a love letter to, and meditation on, specialty coffee. It examines what it takes, and what it means, for coffee to be defined as "specialty." The film whisks audiences on a trip around the world, from farms in Honduras and Rwanda to coffee shops in Tokyo, Portland, Seattle, San Francisco and New York. Through the eyes and experiences of farmers and baristas, the film offers a unique overview of all the elements-the processes, preferences and preparations; traditions old and new-that come together to create the best cups. This is a film that bridges gaps both intellectual and geographical, evoking flavor and pleasure, and providing both as well.

Coffee and Cigarettes

Coffee and Cigarettes

A Film About Coffee

A Film About Coffee

Coffee: Between Reality and Imagination

Coffee: Between Reality and Imagination

Hot Coffee

Hot Coffee

Straight to Hell

Straight to Hell

Smoke

Smoke

Blue in the Face

Blue in the Face

Inside Llewyn Davis

Inside Llewyn Davis

Coffee Futures

Coffee Futures

A Cup of Turkish Coffee

A Cup of Turkish Coffee

Trailer

A Film About Coffee

Face to Face

Face to Face

A firm believer in the idea that a collection needs to be upheld at least by four generations and comparing this continuity to a relay race, Nahit Kabakcı began creating the Huma Kabakcı Collection from the 1980s onwards. 

Paris Without End (1959-1965)

Paris Without End (1959-1965)

In the 60s, Alberto Giacometti paid homage to Paris, the city where he lived, by drawing its streets, cafés, and more private places like his studio and the apartment of his wife, Annette. These drawings would make up his last book, Paris sans fin (Paris Without End). 

A Photographer’s Biography Pascal Sebah

A Photographer’s Biography Pascal Sebah

Following the opening of his studio, “El Chark Societe Photographic,” on Beyoğlu’s Postacılar Caddesi in 1857, the Levantine-descent Pascal Sébah moves to yet another studio next to the Russian Embassy in 1860 with a Frenchman named A. Laroche, who, apart from having worked in Paris previously, is also quite familiar with photographic techniques.