Smoke

  • January 16, 2015 / 20:30
  • January 18, 2015 / 14:00

Directors: Wayne Wang, Paul Auster
Cast: Harvey Keitel, William Hurt, Giancarlo Esposito
Germany, USA, Japan; 112’, 1995, color
English with Turkish subtitles

A film about time, place and transience from writer Paul Auster and director Wayne Wang. Auggie Wren (Harvey Keitel) runs a tobacconist on an intersection in Brooklyn, providing a haven from the hustle and flow for his coterie of peculiar customers. Every morning he takes a photograph from the same spot outside. Every day a network of strangers grows more familiar. Every night Tom Waits reminds us, ‘You’re innocent when ya dream’. A Jarmuschian treat for fans of Auster, Waits and photography.

Coffee and Cigarettes

Coffee and Cigarettes

A Film About Coffee

A Film About Coffee

Coffee: Between Reality and Imagination

Coffee: Between Reality and Imagination

Hot Coffee

Hot Coffee

Straight to Hell

Straight to Hell

Smoke

Smoke

Blue in the Face

Blue in the Face

Inside Llewyn Davis

Inside Llewyn Davis

Coffee Futures

Coffee Futures

A Cup of Turkish Coffee

A Cup of Turkish Coffee

Trailer

Smoke

Giacometti in Paris

Giacometti in Paris

The second part of exhibition illustrates Alberto Giacometti’s relations with Post-Cubist artists and the Surrealist movement between 1922 and 1935, one of the important sculptures series he created during his first years in Paris, and the critical role he played in the art scene of the period.

Bruce Nauman Look At Me!

Bruce Nauman Look At Me!

The exhibition Look at Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection examines portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Through the exhibition we will be sharing about the artists and sections in Look At Me!.

Coming Articles

Coming Articles

Istanbul’s Seaside Leisure: Nostalgia from Sea Baths to Beaches exhibition brought together photographs, magazines, comics, objects, and books from various private and institutional collections, and told a nostalgic story while also addressing the change and socialization of the norms of how Istanbulites used their free time. Istanbul’s Seaside Leisure was a documentary testament of the radical transformations in the Republic’s lifestyle.