The Tailor From Torzhok

  • November 21, 2017 / 19:00
  • November 30, 2017 / 17:00

Director: Yakov Protazanov
Cast: Igor Ilyinsky, Olga Zhizneva, Anatoli Ktorov
Soviet Union, 1925, 60', b&w, Silent
 

From the director of Aelita, this comedy of everyday life during the New Economic Policy period centers around an elusive winning lottery ticket and the domestic troubles of a village tailor, played by the popular Igor Ilyinsky (also featured in Kiss of Mary Pickford). When the film was released, a Pravda critic favorably compared its relatively conventional style to the more politicized agitprop comedies (of which Happiness is a later example): "What can you say about Soviet humor? In the Soviet Union, people laugh for the same reasons as people in other countries....But against this truth, throngs of people, since the Revolution, who are unable to do productive work, have applied themselves to the task of producing Soviet laughter - the famous revolutionary agit-satires....The Tailor from Torzhok is our first successful comic film.

The Extraordinary Adventures of Mr. West in the Land of the Bolsheviks

The Extraordinary Adventures of Mr. West in the Land of the Bolsheviks

The Tailor From Torzhok

The Tailor From Torzhok

Man with a Movie Camera

Man with a Movie Camera

Earth

Earth

Salt for Svanetia

Salt for Svanetia

Alone

Alone

Happiness

Happiness

Trailer

The Tailor From Torzhok

Return from Vienna

Return from Vienna

Józef Brandt harboured a fascination for the history of 17th century Poland, and his favourite themes included ballistic scenes and genre scenes before and after the battle proper –all and sundry marches, returns, supply trains, billets and encampments, patrols, and similar motifs illustrating the drudgery of warfare outside of its culminating moments.

Midnight Horror Stories: <br> Witches’ Sun <br> Mehmet Berk Yaltırık

Midnight Horror Stories:
Witches’ Sun
Mehmet Berk Yaltırık

I walk over rocks hot as iron under the September sun. I can make out a few lines in the distance, and a few cracked rocks, but apart from those, not a single tree, not one plant

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.