The Colors that Combine to Make White Are Important

  • October 3, 2013 / 19:00
  • October 12, 2013 / 18:00

Director: Barry Doupé
Canada, Japan; color, 120’, 2012
Japanese with Turkish subtitles


The film explores the power structure within a failing Japanese glass factory. Two parallel storylines — one involving the investigation of a suspect employee, the other a stolen painting — converge in an exposition on gender and desire. Doupé’s computer-animated film has its characters rapidly evolve through three distinct acts, while subverting the dominant archetypes in the Japanese salary man genre. The hierarchical relationship between boss and employees is undone to examine language, art, and expression. Doupé’s characters are looking for something only to be found through a crisis of feeling, a shaking up of the human world.

Walk Through

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Monuments

Monuments

The Colors that Combine to Make White Are Important

The Colors that Combine to Make White Are Important

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Works by a large number of students from the Academy of Fine Arts in Sarajevo deal with current and often painful themes from the socio-political, economic and cultural reality, raising awareness, appealing, warning, opening issues and offering new interpretations.

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