Director: François Caillat
France, color, 2004, 75’
French with Turkish subtitles

A filmmaker travels through the mountain villages along the shores of Alpine lakes to investigate the disappearance of Valérie 20 years ago. She allegedly murdered a Canadian tourist before disappearing without a trace. At least that is how the narrator remembers the story, while passing through the region at the time. Over the course of the interviews, the elusive Valérie seems to disappear a second time, literally engulfed by the Alpine landscape, magnificently captured on film by François Caillat. A haunting, imposing landscape, where chasms and precipices become metaphors, characters in a work of fiction that the camera turns into a documentary. It is a film in the form of an essay in which the director takes his work on memory to its highest degree of abstraction.

L'affaire Valerie

L'affaire Valerie

Trois Soldats Allemands

Trois Soldats Allemands

La Quatrieme Generation

La Quatrieme Generation

Une Jeunesse Amoureuse

Une Jeunesse Amoureuse

Janine Antoni Look At Me!

Janine Antoni Look At Me!

The exhibition Look at Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection examines portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Through the exhibition we will be sharing about the artists and sections in Look At Me!. This time we are sharing about Janine Antoni , exhibited under the section “The Conventions of Identitiy”!

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Martín Zapater y Clavería, born in Zaragoza on November 12th 1747, came from a family of modest merchants and was taken in to live with a well-to-do aunt, Juana Faguás, and her daughter, Joaquina de Alduy. He studied with Goya in the Escuelas Pías school in Zaragoza from 1752 to 1757 and a friendship arose between them which was to last until the death of Zapater in 1803. 

A Photographer’s Biography Pascal Sebah

A Photographer’s Biography Pascal Sebah

Following the opening of his studio, “El Chark Societe Photographic,” on Beyoğlu’s Postacılar Caddesi in 1857, the Levantine-descent Pascal Sébah moves to yet another studio next to the Russian Embassy in 1860 with a Frenchman named A. Laroche, who, apart from having worked in Paris previously, is also quite familiar with photographic techniques.