Hakob Hovnatanyan

  • February 23, 2019 / 15:00
  • March 10, 2019 / 13:00

Director: Sergey Parajanov
Soviet Union, 1967, 10',  color
French, Armenian with Turkish subtitles 

Sergey Parajanov offers an overview of the portrait painting of the man called “the Raphael of Tiflis”, Hakob Hovnatanyan (1806 – 1881). A distinguished member of the artistic dynasty of Hovnatanyan portrait painters, Hakob is widely seen as the founder of modern Armenian painting and a master of portraiture and miniatures. In his short documentary film about the artist, Parajanov combines sights and sounds from both Hovnatanyan’s paintings and 19th Century Tbilisi, bringing to dazzling life its artistic culture.

Free admissions. Drop in, no reservations.

Andriesh

Andriesh

The First Lad

The First Lad

Ukrainian Rhapsody

Ukrainian Rhapsody

Flower on the Stone

Flower on the Stone

Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors

Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors

Hakob Hovnatanyan

Hakob Hovnatanyan

The Color of Pomegranates

The Color of Pomegranates

The Seasons of the Year

The Seasons of the Year

The Legend of Suram Fortress

The Legend of Suram Fortress

Arabesques on the Pirosmani Theme

Arabesques on the Pirosmani Theme

Ashik Kerib

Ashik Kerib

Parajanov: A Requiem

Parajanov: A Requiem

Sergey Parajanov: The Rebel

Sergey Parajanov: The Rebel

I Copy Therefore I Am

I Copy Therefore I Am

Suggesting alternative models for new social and economic systems, SUPERFLEX works appear before us as energy systems, beverages, sculptures, copies, hypnosis sessions, infrastructure, paintings, plant nurseries, contracts, or specifically designed public spaces.

Turquerie

Turquerie

Having penetrated the Balkans in the fourteenth century, conquered Constantinople in the fifteenth, and reached the gates of Vienna in the sixteenth, the Ottoman Empire long struck fear into European hearts. 

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.