The Seasons of the Year

  • February 23, 2019 / 15:00
  • March 10, 2019 / 13:00

Director: Artavazd Peleshian
Armenia, 1975, 29',  b&w
Armenian with Turkish subtitles

In his final collaboration with cinematographer Mikhail Vartanov, Artavazd Peleshian films an isolated farming community in its relentless fight against the elements. The farmers herd sheep and work their land all year long. In the spring, they climb into the mountains with their herds, and at the end of the summer they harvest the hay, which falls down in a dusty avalanche of hay bales. In the winter, they make their way through the snow, sheep in tow. This is humanity, trapped in a brutish, but also beautiful reality. With a melodic rhythm of camera, editing and bittersweet classical music, Peleshian and Vartanov raise their film to the level of a true symphony - the symphony of our existence.

Free admissions. Drop in, no reservations.

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