Cul-de-sac

  • November 5, 2014 / 19:00
  • November 29, 2014 / 16:00

Director: Roman Polanski
Cast: Donald Pleasence, Françoise Dorléac, Lionel Stander
UK, 113’, 1966, black and white

English with Turkish subtitles

Polanski orchestrates a mental ménage à trois in this slyly absurd tale of paranoia from the director’s golden 1960s period. Donald Pleasence and Françoise Dorléac star as a withdrawn couple whose isolated house is invaded by a rude, burly American gangster on the run, played by Lionel Stander. The three engage in role-playing games of sexual and emotional humiliation. Cul-de-sac is an evocative, claustrophobic, and morbidly funny tale of the modern world in chaos.

Knife in the Water

Knife in the Water

Repulsion

Repulsion

Cul-de-sac

Cul-de-sac

Rosemary's Baby

Rosemary's Baby

Tess

Tess

Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired

Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired

Trailer

Cul-de-sac

Good News from the Skies

Good News from the Skies

Inspired by the exhibition And Now the Good News, which focusing on the relationship between mass media and art, we prepared horoscope readings based on the chapters of the exhibition. Using the popular astrological language inspired by the effects of the movements of celestial bodies on people, these readings with references to the works in the exhibition make fictional future predictions inspired by the horoscope columns that we read in the newspapers with the desire to receive good news about our day. 

A Photographer’s Biography Ali Sami Aközer

A Photographer’s Biography Ali Sami Aközer

Ali Sami is born in Rusçuk in 1866, and moves to İstanbul. Because his family is registered in the Beylerbeyi quarter of Üsküdar, Ali Sami is also called Üsküdarlı Ali Sami. He graduates from the Mühendishane-i Berri-i Hümayun in 1866 and becomes a teacher of painting and photography at the school.

Introducing… Turkish coffee!

Introducing… Turkish coffee!

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, Pera Museum invites artist Benoît Hamet to reinterpret key pieces from its collections, casting a humourous eye over ‘historical’ events, both imagined and factual.