White, White Storks

  • April 25, 2015 / 14:00
  • May 7, 2015 / 19:00

Director: Ali Hamroyev
USSR, Uzbekistan, 1966, 82’, black & white

Cast: Lyutfi Sarymsakova, Sairam Isayeva, Bolot Bejshenaliyev, Khikmat Latypov, Mokhammed Rafikov
Russian with Turkish subtitles

In his first feature to receive international acclaim, Hamroyev took a painterly view of the landscape of the steppes while establishing his trademark theme of the role of atypical and rebellious women. Set in the rural village of White Storks, the story tackles the taboo subject of an extramarital affair. Strong-willed Malika, married but childless, is openly consorting with another man with whom she shares a seemingly tender bond. Even more fascinating than the trajectory of the affair itself is Hamroyev’s detailing of intricate, tradition-bound family relationships, and his depiction of customs including the violent, fast-paced horseback game of Buzkashi.

White, White Storks

White, White Storks

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