The Lake

Director: Ömer Kavur
Cast: Müjde Ar, Hakan Balamir, Talat Bulut, Orhan Çağman, Mehmet Esen, Ferda Ferdağ, Aydan Burhan
Turkey, 1982, 83’,color, Turkish with English subtitles
 

A psychological thriller about a morbid passion, The Lake starts as Nalan (Müje Ar), a singer who works in the big city, receives an invitation from a night-club in the small town. When Nalan arrives in town, these words salute the viewer: “Life in a town is forlorn.” Nalan, taken captive by the most powerful man in the town, Murat (Hakan Balamir), as a substitute for his dead wife, tries to ease this sense of forlornness through her feelings for Hasan, while Murat’s obsession about “everything will be as it used to be” creates the suspenseful atmosphere of the film. In the small scale and constraint of the town, the aforementioned “forlornness” morphs into “eeriness” for Nalan, who is seen as “foreign” and thus an “object of desire.” Written by Selim Ileri and produced by Atıf Yılmaz, The Lake will be screened in commemoration of Hakan Balamir.

The Lake

The Lake

Driver Nebahat

Driver Nebahat

Black Car

Black Car

Keşanlı Ali's Epic

Keşanlı Ali's Epic

Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel

Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel

In 1998 Ben Jakober and Yannick Vu collaborated on an obvious remake of Marcel Duchamp’s Roue de Bicyclette, his first “readymade” object. Duchamp combined a bicycle wheel, a fork and a stool to create a machine which served no purpose, subverting accepted norms of art. 

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.

Symbols

Symbols

Pera Museum’s Cold Front from the Balkans exhibition curated by Ali Akay and Alenka Gregorič brings together contemporary artists from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Slovenia.