Nanook of the North

  • October 11, 2019 / 19:00
  • November 10, 2019 / 18:00

Director: Robert J. Flaherty
Cast: Allakariallak, Alice Nevalinga, Cunayou, Allegoo
USA, France, 1922, 78', DCP, siyah-beyaz / b&w
No dialogue

This pioneering documentary film depicts the lives of the indigenous Inuit people of Canada's northern Quebec region. Although the production contains some fictional elements, it vividly shows how its resourceful subjects survive in such a harsh climate, revealing how they construct their igloo homes and find food by hunting and fishing. The film also captures the beautiful, if unforgiving, frozen landscape of the Great White North, far removed from conventional civilization. Nanook of the North was widely shown and praised as the first full-length, anthropological documentary in cinematographic history.

This program’s screenings and events are free of admissions. Drop in, no reservations. As per legal regulations, all our screenings are restricted to persons over 18 years of age, unless stated otherwise.

Nanook of the North

Nanook of the North

Planet of the Apes

Planet of the Apes

Princess Mononoke

Princess Mononoke

O Brother, Where Art Thou?

O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Frozen River

Frozen River

Beuys

Beuys

Sakawa

Sakawa

Yuva

Yuva

One Man Dies A Million Times

One Man Dies A Million Times

The Sounds of Science

The Sounds of Science

Trailer

Nanook of the North

Symbols

Symbols

Pera Museum’s Cold Front from the Balkans exhibition curated by Ali Akay and Alenka Gregorič brings together contemporary artists from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Slovenia.

I Copy Therefore I Am

I Copy Therefore I Am

Suggesting alternative models for new social and economic systems, SUPERFLEX works appear before us as energy systems, beverages, sculptures, copies, hypnosis sessions, infrastructure, paintings, plant nurseries, contracts, or specifically designed public spaces.

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.