Flotel Europa

  • September 20, 2015 / 15:00
  • September 26, 2015 / 14:00

Director: Vladimir Tomic
Denmark, Serbia, 2015, 70’, color

Bosnian with Turkish subtitles

In 1992 a wave of refugees from the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina reached Denmark. With existing refugee camps completely full, the Red Cross pulled a giant ship into the canals of Copenhagen. The ship, Flotel Europa, became a temporary home for a thousand people waiting for decisions on their asylum applications. Among them was a 12-year-old boy, Vladimir, who fled Sarajevo with his mother and older brother. They spent two years in limbo at Flotel Europa. Two decades later, director Vladimir Tomić takes us on a journey of growing up on this ship filled with echoes of the war — and other ordeals of an adolescent. This coming-of-age story is juxtaposed with personal VHS archive material shot by refugees who shared the “space-time vacuum” of the Flotel.

Halima’s Path

Halima’s Path

One Day in Sarajevo

One Day in Sarajevo

Flotel Europa

Flotel Europa

Belvedere

Belvedere

Self Reflection

Self Reflection

Trailer

Flotel Europa

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

“The portrait tells us that there is an inner and an outer dimension of the human condition; it provides—or should provide—information about both the physical and psychological character of an individual.” 

Girl in a Blue Dress

Girl in a Blue Dress

This life-size portrait of a girl is a fine example of the British art of portrait painting in the early 18th century. The child is shown posing on a terrace, which is enclosed at the right foreground by the plinth of a pillar; the background is mainly filled with trees and shrubs. 

Midnight Stories: Hotel of Retro Dreams

Midnight Stories: Hotel of Retro Dreams

Pera Museum Blog is launching a new series of “Techno- Dystopia” stories in collaboration with Turkey’s Fantasy and Science Fiction Arts Association (FABISAD). The Association’s member writers are presenting newly commissioned short stories inspired by the artworks of Katherine Behar as part of the Museum’s Data’s Entry exhibition.