Five October

  • December 20, 2017 / 17:00
  • December 29, 2017 / 19:00

Director: Martin Kollár
Slovakia, Czechia, 2016, 50', color
Slovak with Turkish subtitles
 

The protagonist of this quiet picture is the director’s 52-year-old brother Ján Kollár, who learns that he needs to undergo a hazardous procedure with only a 50-50 chance of surviving. Ján takes his bike and a minimum of equipment and sets out on perhaps the last journey he’ll ever take when he can essentially do everything exactly the way he wants. The only limitation is the day set for his operation – October 5th. With its refined imaging, the visually precise movie bears witness to the physical and spiritual wanderings of a man in a crucial life situation. Employing sensitivity without pathos, the director records Ján’s struggle against fear and his sincere effort to stand face-to-face with his circumstances and find reconciliation. Ján commits his thoughts and feelings to a journal, excerpts of which serve as a formal element in this contemplative, powerful film.

Daisies

Daisies

Escape from the ‘Liberty’ Cinema

Escape from the ‘Liberty’ Cinema

The Garden

The Garden

Conspirators of Pleasure

Conspirators of Pleasure

Afterlife

Afterlife

Free Fall

Free Fall

Goat

Goat

Five October

Five October

I, Olga

I, Olga

Communion

Communion

Little Harbour

Little Harbour

On Body and Soul

On Body and Soul

Photon

Photon

Trailer

Five October

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.

Symbols

Symbols

Pera Museum’s Cold Front from the Balkans exhibition curated by Ali Akay and Alenka Gregorič brings together contemporary artists from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Slovenia.

I Copy Therefore I Am

I Copy Therefore I Am

Suggesting alternative models for new social and economic systems, SUPERFLEX works appear before us as energy systems, beverages, sculptures, copies, hypnosis sessions, infrastructure, paintings, plant nurseries, contracts, or specifically designed public spaces.