Korean Film Days

October 9 - October 16, 2015

Pera Film in collaboration with Embassy of Korea in Ankara is presenting a program of modern Korean Cinema. The selection sheds light on a new generation of directors. Jennifer Rousse-Marquet in her ina global web article underlines that: “South Korea is one of the few countries where local productions have a dominant share of the domestic market, surpassing American movies. Not only do Korean movies garner public attention in their homeland, but they also win awards in prestigious international film festivals such as Cannes, Berlin or Venice.” This five-film selection spans over ten years and brings together different genres of visually enticing films with unique storytelling.

This program’s screenings are free of admissions. Drop in.

    

In collaboration

October 9

16:00 The Face Reader

October 10

14:00 Always

16:00 Forever the Moment

19:00 Welcome to Dongmakgol

October 11

14:00 How to Steal a Dog

17:00 The Face Reader

October 13

19:00 Welcome to Dongmakgol

October 14

19:00 Forever the Moment

October 16

19:00 Always

21:00 How to Steal a Dog

The Face Reader

The Face Reader

Always

Always

Forever the Moment

Forever the Moment

Welcome to Dongmakgol

Welcome to Dongmakgol

How to Steal a Dog

How to Steal a Dog

Program Trailer

Korean Film Days

This five-film selection spans over ten years and brings together different genres of visually enticing films with unique storytelling.

It’s better to burn out than to fade away

It’s better to burn out than to fade away

In 1962 Philip Corner, one of the most prominent members of the Fluxus movement, caused a great commotion in serious music circles when during a performance entitled Piano Activities he climbed up onto a grand piano and began to kick it while other members of the group attacked it with saws, hammers and all kinds of other implements.

Istanbul-Paris-Istanbul: Mario Prassinos

Istanbul-Paris-Istanbul: Mario Prassinos

Mario Prassinos liked Istanbul more than the current Istanbulites of today. It is obvious that you can understand this from the article written by her daughter Catherine Prassinos in the Pera Museum's book on the artist.

Portrait of a Bullfighter (1797)

Portrait of a Bullfighter (1797)

The man is depicted in three-quarters view, turning straight to the viewers with a penetrating glance. The background is grey, while the clothes, the hair, and cap are black.