Town of Runners

  • January 12, 2014 / 14:00
  • January 17, 2014 / 19:00

Director: Jerry Rothwell
United Kingdom; 86’, 2012, color
English with Turkish subtitles

The world’s best long-distance runners hail from one small town in Ethiopia. See how they do it! Long distance running is a way of life in the Arsi region of Ethiopia. In a country long associated with poverty, famine and war, world-record-beating athletes are the source of pride. Many of the world’s greatest runners hail from Bekoji, a remote town in the southern Highlands. In the Beijing Olympics, runners from the Bekoji won all four gold medals in the long distance track events - more medals than most industrial countries. Town of Runners is a feature documentary by an award-winning director Jerry Rothwell (Donor Unknown, Heavy Load) about the young athletes born and raised in Bekoji, who hope to emulate their local heroes and compete on the world’s stage. Filmed over four years, the film follows their fortunes as they move from school track to national competition and from childhood to adulthood.

InRealLife

InRealLife

The House I Live In

The House I Live In

Town of Runners

Town of Runners

Sound it Out

Sound it Out

Girl Model

Girl Model

Tabloid

Tabloid

Trailer

Town of Runners

Return from Vienna

Return from Vienna

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The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

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