The Queen and I

  • March 15, 2015 / 13:00
  • March 20, 2015 / 13:00

Director: Nahid Persson Sarvestani
Sweden, 2008, Blu-Ray, Color, 90’
English, Sweedish,Persian, Turkish and English Subtitles

The director decides to make a documentary about Farrah, the wife of Iran’s shah. Nahid Persson Sarvestani who spent her childhood in poverty has watched her wedding like a fairy tale. Queen Farrah meets her like another refugee from her country and the director gets into the queen’s world for one and a half years, with a plan to confront the ideology of the shah. When the fact that Nahid Persson Sarvestani had previously opposed to the shah is revealed, the queen ceases the shooting but they maintain a close friendship, trying to understand each other’s experiences.

My Stolen Revolution

My Stolen Revolution

The Queen and I

The Queen and I

Prostitution Behind the Veil

Prostitution Behind the Veil

Dancing on Architecture

Dancing on Architecture

I think it was Frank Zappa – though others claim it was Laurie Anderson – who said in an interview that ‘writing on music is much like dancing on architecture’. 

Fluid Identities  Creating an Identity / Hybrid Identities

Fluid Identities Creating an Identity / Hybrid Identities

A firm believer in the idea that a collection needs to be upheld at least by four generations and comparing this continuity to a relay race, Nahit Kabakcı began creating the Huma Kabakcı Collection from the 1980s onwards. Today, the collection can be considered one of the most important and outstanding examples among the rare, consciously created, and long-lasting ones of its kind in Turkey.

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Martín Zapater y Clavería, born in Zaragoza on November 12th 1747, came from a family of modest merchants and was taken in to live with a well-to-do aunt, Juana Faguás, and her daughter, Joaquina de Alduy. He studied with Goya in the Escuelas Pías school in Zaragoza from 1752 to 1757 and a friendship arose between them which was to last until the death of Zapater in 1803.