Soul Train

  • October 22, 2017 / 14:00
  • October 27, 2017 / 20:30

Director: Nermin Hamzagić
Bosnia and Herzegovina, 2016, 78', color
Bosnian with Turkish subtitles

 

Soul Train hits you like a truck from the very first second, and it doesn’t stop until the very end. You will see a side of Bosnia you don’t see very often in film. This high-energy and highly entertaining (and at times humorous) film is described as the first-ever film to tell stories about Bosnian hip-hop and rap music and the leading Bosnian artists and musicians behind the genre. For five days, rappers Frankie and Kontra, DJ Soul and music producer Billain traveled more than 500 kilometers, visit Tuzla, Banja Luka, Zenica, Sarajevo, Mostar and Konjic, meeting musicians from Bosnia and Herzegovina. On the road, they recorded sounds and created new songs.

Sevdah

Sevdah

Whose is this song?

Whose is this song?

The Heart of Wood

The Heart of Wood

No smoking in Sarajevo

No smoking in Sarajevo

Sevdalinka: The Alchemy of Soul

Sevdalinka: The Alchemy of Soul

Soul Train

Soul Train

Trailer

Soul Train

The Golden Horn

The Golden Horn

When regarding the paintings of Istanbul by western painters, Golden Horn has a distinctive place and value. This body of water that separates the Topkapı Palace and the Historical Peninsula, in which monumental edifices are located, from Galata, where westerners and foreign embassies dwell, is as though an interpenetrating boundary.

Stefan Hablützel Look At Me!

Stefan Hablützel Look At Me!

The exhibition Look at Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection examines portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Through the exhibition we will be sharing about the artists and sections in “Look At Me!”.

Midnight Stories: COGITO <br> Tevfik Uyar

Midnight Stories: COGITO
Tevfik Uyar

He had imagined the court room as a big place. It wasn’t. It was about the size of his living room, with an elevation at one end, with a dais on it. The judges and the attorneys sat there. Below it was an old wooden rail, worn out in some places. That was his place. There was another seat for his lawyer. At the back, about 20 or 30 chairs were stowed out for the non-existent crowd.