Sevdah

  • October 21, 2017 / 14:00
  • October 22, 2017 / 16:00

Director: Marina Andree Skop
Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, 2009, 66', color, b&w
Croatian, Bosnian with Turkish subtitles

 

Sevdah is a feeling of melancholy, yearning and sorrow. In traditional Bosnian music, it is most poignantly expressed through a traditional mournful song – sevdalinka. The death of Farah, a mutual friend and fellow sevdalinka lover, brings together the musician Damir and the art director Marina, who in order to cope with their own sense of loss and grief, set out to make a film about sevdah. The result is an emotionally charged and visually arresting journey to the very heart and soul of Bosnia, a story of personal loss echoing the destiny of a small country, told through its deeply soulful music.

Sevdah

Sevdah

Whose is this song?

Whose is this song?

The Heart of Wood

The Heart of Wood

No smoking in Sarajevo

No smoking in Sarajevo

Sevdalinka: The Alchemy of Soul

Sevdalinka: The Alchemy of Soul

Soul Train

Soul Train

Trailer

Sevdah

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