Filmmaker: Bilge Olgaç
Cast: Perihan Savaş, Berhan Şimşek, Gülsen Tuncer
Turkey, 1987, DVD, Color, 92’, Turkish

A woman carried to the village on a trailer truck, attracting attention with her silky hair reaching her waist… The villagers put her in a hut. When the woman falls in love with the embroider decorating the hut, she has to face the patriarchal morality of the villagers.

Short Films 1

Short Films 1

My Beautiful Country

My Beautiful Country

Don’t Shoot the Messenger

Don’t Shoot the Messenger

Dolls Can’t Cry

Dolls Can’t Cry

Mohtarama

Mohtarama

Silky

Silky

Salma

Salma

Tokyo’s Belly

Tokyo’s Belly

The Present Tense

The Present Tense

How to Lose Your Virginity

How to Lose Your Virginity

Hunger

Hunger

Short Films 2

Short Films 2

Watchtower

Watchtower

Eat Sleep Die

Eat Sleep Die

The Spoon Haters

The Spoon Haters

Short Films3

Short Films3

Secret Subject

Secret Subject

Jin

Jin

Explore the Museum with the Little Yellow Circle!

Explore the Museum with the Little Yellow Circle!

Published as part of Pera Learning programs, “The Little Yellow Circle (Küçük Sarı Daire)” is a children’s book written by Tania Bahar and illustrated by Marina Rico, offering children and adults to a novel learning experience where they can share and discover together.

Good News from the Skies

Good News from the Skies

Inspired by the exhibition And Now the Good News, which focusing on the relationship between mass media and art, we prepared horoscope readings based on the chapters of the exhibition. Using the popular astrological language inspired by the effects of the movements of celestial bodies on people, these readings with references to the works in the exhibition make fictional future predictions inspired by the horoscope columns that we read in the newspapers with the desire to receive good news about our day. 

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.