Side By Side

  • March 2, 2014 / 18:00
  • March 7, 2014 / 21:00

Director:  Christopher Kenneally
USA 99’, 2012, color

English with Turkish subtitles 

For almost one hundred years there was only one way to make a movie — with film. 

Movies were shot, edited and projected using photochemical film. But over the last two decades a digital process has emerged to challenge photochemical filmmaking. Side By Side, a new documentary produced by Keanu Reeves, takes an in-depth look at this revolution. Through in-depth interviews with Hollywood masters, such as James Cameron, David Fincher, David Lynch, Martin Scorsese, Steven Soderbergh, and many more, cinematographers, film students, producers, technologists, editors, and exhibitors, Side By Side examines all aspects of filmmaking — from capture to edit, visual effects to color correction, distribution to archive. At this moment when digital and photochemical filmmaking coexist, SIDE BY SIDE explores what has been gained, what is lost, and what the future might bring.

Deaf Jam

Deaf Jam

Mondays at Racine

Mondays at Racine

Off the Rez

Off the Rez

Brooklyn Castle

Brooklyn Castle

Lives Worth Living

Lives Worth Living

Inocente

Inocente

Side By Side

Side By Side

Trailer

Side By Side

Return from Vienna

Return from Vienna

Józef Brandt harboured a fascination for the history of 17th century Poland, and his favourite themes included ballistic scenes and genre scenes before and after the battle proper –all and sundry marches, returns, supply trains, billets and encampments, patrols, and similar motifs illustrating the drudgery of warfare outside of its culminating moments.

The Welcoming of Venetian Balios to Ottoman Lands

The Welcoming of Venetian Balios to Ottoman Lands

The series of paintings depicting the audience ceremonies of European ambassadors hold a unique place among the works of Jean-Baptiste Vanmour of Valenciennes, who lived in İstanbul from 1699 until his death in 1737.

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.