Mondays at Racine

  • March 2, 2014 / 14:00
  • March 7, 2014 / 18:00

Director:  Cynthia Wade
USA 40’, 2012, color

English with Turkish subtitles

Every third Monday of the month, brassy Long Island, New York sisters Cynthia and Rachel open up their hair salon, called Racine, and offer free beauty services for women undergoing chemotherapy.  Determined to make their customers feel beautiful, the glamour duo knows that Mondays at Racine goes beyond purple painted toes or a frothy facial.  The sisters are determined to give women who are losing their hair, eyebrows and eyelashes a sense of normalcy and dignity in a traumatic and uncertain time. The story of what hair means in our culture quickly unfolds into an unexpected look at womanhood, marriage and survival.

Deaf Jam

Deaf Jam

Mondays at Racine

Mondays at Racine

Off the Rez

Off the Rez

Brooklyn Castle

Brooklyn Castle

Lives Worth Living

Lives Worth Living

Inocente

Inocente

Side By Side

Side By Side

Trailer

Mondays at Racine

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