Home Video: Media Art in Response to HIV/AIDS

  • December 9, 2017 / 18:00
  • December 10, 2017 / 15:00

The Thursday People, George Kuchar, 1987, 12’
We Care, Women’s AIDS Video Enterprise, 1990, 12’
Portrait of Martin Wong, Charlie Ahearn, 1992/1998, 18’
A Place in the City: Three Stories About AIDS at Home, Nate Lavey & Stephen Vider, 2017, 18'


The four videos in this program engage the concept of “home video,” making use of consumer video technology and the aesthetics of the camcorder era to create works that explore the intersections of art, caretaking, family, and home. In The Thursday People, legendary film and videomaker George Kuchar elegizes, with characteristic candor and humor, his friend, lover, collaborator, and fellow underground cinema legend, filmmaker Curt McDowell. In the weeks after his death from AIDS-related illnesses, McDowell is recalled by friends and family at a weekly gathering, in what had been his Mission District home, called the “Soiree.” Charlie Ahearn offers his own intimate video portrait, documenting artist Martin Wong in his Lower East Side apartment. Ahearn provides a view of the artist “at home” — not only in his apartment and studio, but in the neighborhoods of the Lower East Side and Chinatown, which Wong rendered indelibly in his paintings. We Care was collectively produced by WAVE, a remarkable “video support group” sponsored by the Brooklyn AIDS Task Force and arts funding organizations. The video, which includes intimate conversations with caregivers and people living with AIDS, represents the result of six months of meetings among seven women exploring HIV/AIDS and video. A Place in the City: Three Stories of AIDS at Home examines how artists and activists have expanded the idea of caretaking, family, and housing while living with AIDS in the 21st century. As Catherine Saalfield writes, “The result is a rich grassroots effort which documents many challenges that AIDS present to care-givers and which rebukes many common myths about HIV/AIDS.” These works continue to resonate today whether by challenging still-held misconceptions of living with HIV/AIDS or offering a view of artmaking in a less gentrified New York and San Francisco.

Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures

Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures

How to Survive a Plague

How to Survive a Plague

120 BPM

120 BPM

Home Video: Media Art in Response to HIV/AIDS

Home Video: Media Art in Response to HIV/AIDS

Alternate Endings, Radical Beginnings

Alternate Endings, Radical Beginnings

Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel

Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel

In 1998 Ben Jakober and Yannick Vu collaborated on an obvious remake of Marcel Duchamp’s Roue de Bicyclette, his first “readymade” object. Duchamp combined a bicycle wheel, a fork and a stool to create a machine which served no purpose, subverting accepted norms of art. 

Turquerie

Turquerie

Having penetrated the Balkans in the fourteenth century, conquered Constantinople in the fifteenth, and reached the gates of Vienna in the sixteenth, the Ottoman Empire long struck fear into European hearts. 

When Metaphysical Art is Mentioned, His Name Comes to Mind <br>  Who Is Giorgio de Chirico?

When Metaphysical Art is Mentioned, His Name Comes to Mind
Who Is Giorgio de Chirico?

Giorgio de Chirico was born on July 10, 1888, in Volos, Greece, to an Italian family. His mother, Gemma Cervetto, was from a family of Genoa origin, but most likely she was born in Izmir. His father, Evaristo, was born on June 21, 1841 in the Büyükdere district of Istanbul.