A Symphony of Sound: The Velvet Underground and Nico

  • June 20, 2014 / 20:30
  • June 21, 2014 / 19:00

A Symphony of Sound: The Velvet Underground and Nico , 1966, 66’
16mm film, black and white, sound

Transferred from 16 mm to DVD
Collection of The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh

Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
©2014 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a Museum of Carnegie Institute
All rights reserved.

Warhol's classic 1966 music documentary has been described by critics as "eternally chic" and, according to writer and biographer Victor Bockris, "remains the single best visual record of the Velvet Underground". Recorded during a practice session at the Factory; shot in January 1966, it shows the group rehearsing for what was probably their opening at the Film-Makers' Cinematheque basement theater. Nico, the German singer and actress whom Warhol introduced into the band, sits on a stool and bangs a tambourine, while her son Ari plays on the floor at her feet. The two reels contain a great deal of wild camerawork and psychedelic zooming, which indicates that this film was intended for exhibition, probably in double-screen, behind the Velvet Underground on stage.

The Chelsea Girls

The Chelsea Girls

Vinyl

Vinyl

A Symphony of Sound: The Velvet Underground and Nico

A Symphony of Sound: The Velvet Underground and Nico

Trailer

A Symphony of Sound: The Velvet Underground and Nico

Baby King

Baby King

1638, the year Louis XIV was born –his second name, Dieudonné, alluding to his God-given status– saw the diffusion of a cult of maternity encouraged by the very devout Anne of Austria, in thanks for the miracle by which she had given birth to an heir to the French throne. Simon François de Tours (1606-1671) painted the Queen in the guise of the Virgin Mary, and the young Louis XIV as the infant Jesus, in the allegorical portrait now in the Bishop’s Palace at Sens.

Game of Mangala

Game of Mangala

Three figures in Eastern dress are shown in repose against an exotic landscape, smoking pipes and playing mangala. Inventories of the royal collections from 1739 identify the members of this group as the royal eunuch Matthias and two odalisques. 

Medicinal Herbs in Byzantium

Medicinal Herbs in Byzantium

Knowledge of plants and the practice of healing are closely entwined. The toxic or hallucinogenic nature of some roots, and the dangers associated with picking them, conferred a mythical or magical character and power.