Measure of Human

July 24 - August 24, 2020

Pera Film presents the online version of the Pera Museum’s Anatolian Weights and Measures Collection exhibition. In a time when our perceptions are altered and lead us to new practices that defy our standards, Measure of Human program explores the history and evolution of weights and measures – the first forms of universal standards. Suna and İnan Kıraç Foundation Anatolian Weights and Measures Collection exhibition is home to a variety of weights and measures used, evolved, measured and standardized in the Anatolia region over the course of around four millennia from 2000 BCE to today. The program’s documentary and videos shed light on the deep-rooted history of the practices of measuring and weighing. Measure of Human program is available online on the Pera Museum website until August 24.

Weights And Measures Issue Title Weight And Sea

Weights And Measures Issue Title Weight And Sea

Weights And Measures

Weights And Measures

Paperweights

Paperweights

Modern Scales

Modern Scales

Precision: The Measure of All Things

Precision: The Measure of All Things

Cloud Profiles: Weightless Measures

Cloud Profiles: Weightless Measures

For All the Time, for All the Sad Stones

For All the Time, for All the Sad Stones

Louis Isadore Kahn (1901-1974)

Louis Isadore Kahn (1901-1974)

Louis Isadore Kahn was born in 1901 to a Jewish family in Pärnu, Russia (today Estonia), far from Philadelphia where he spent his whole life, worked, fell in love, and breathed his last. Kahn family emigrated to America when he was five years old. 

Cindy Sherman Look At Me!

Cindy Sherman Look At Me!

The exhibition Look at Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection examines portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Through the exhibition we will be sharing about the artists and sections in Look At Me!.

Mosques in the 18th and 19th Century Paintings

Mosques in the 18th and 19th Century Paintings

In the works of western painters, we encounter mosques as the primary architectural elements that reflect the identity of the city of Istanbul. Often we can recognize the depicted landscape as Istanbul simply from the mosques.