Turkish Chronicles

  • March 24, 2023 / 19:30
  • March 31, 2023 / 21:00

Director: Maurice Pialat
French with Turkish subtitles 

“These films offer an insight into the particular relationship between documentary and fiction in Pialat’s filmmaking.” - Museum of the Moving Image 

In 1964, Pialat and cinematographer Willy Kurant headed to Turkey, where they produced a series of five lyrical shorts dedicated to the country’s history and people.

Bosphore
France, 1964, 14', b&w

Made for the Turkish Chronicles, a series of short documentaries shot in Turkey, Bosphore is the most classic, for his harmony between voice and image, and the most pictural.

Byzance
France, 1964, 11', HDD, b&w 

Byzance uses a text by Stefan Zweig to describe the Ottoman conquest of the city in 1453. 

La Corne d'Or
France, 1964, 12', b&w

La Corne d'Or juxtaposes a poem by Gérard de Nerval with a powerful study of Ottoman architecture.

İstanbul 
France, 1964, 13', b&w

Istanbul takes into the crowded streets and back alleys of a fascinating city divided between continents. Istanbul is one of the six shorts Maurice Pialat dedicated to Turkey. 

Maître Galip
France, 1964, 11', b&w

One of the most beautiful film in the Turkish Chronicles series, over the poems of Nazim Hikmet.

The Immortal

The Immortal

The City

The City

Tongue Twister

Tongue Twister

Zombie and The Ghost Train

Zombie and The Ghost Train

Turkish Chronicles

Turkish Chronicles

I Copy Therefore I Am

I Copy Therefore I Am

Suggesting alternative models for new social and economic systems, SUPERFLEX works appear before us as energy systems, beverages, sculptures, copies, hypnosis sessions, infrastructure, paintings, plant nurseries, contracts, or specifically designed public spaces.

Symbols

Symbols

Pera Museum’s Cold Front from the Balkans exhibition curated by Ali Akay and Alenka Gregorič brings together contemporary artists from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Slovenia.

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.