The Human Scale

  • February 15, 2018 / 19:00
  • February 18, 2018 / 14:00

Director: Andreas Dalsgaard
Cast: Jan Gehl, Rob Adams, Robert Doyle, Lars Gemzøe
Denmark, 2012, 77’, color
English with Turkish subtitles
 

50% of the world’s population lives in urban areas. By 2050 this will increase to 80%. Life in a mega city is both enchanting and problematic. Today we face peak oil, climate change, loneliness and severe health issues due to our way of life. But why? The Danish architect and professor Jan Gehl has studied human behavior in cities through 40 years. He has documented how modern cities repel human interaction, and argues that we can build cities in a way, which takes human needs for inclusion and intimacy into account. It doesn’t matter if it’s New York's financial district or the slums of Dhaka, the central questions remain the same: Can a city make us happy? What makes a good city? The Human Scale meets international urban planners, architects and other thinkers exploring these very questions.

These screenings are free of admissions. Drop in, no reservations.

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Sidewalls

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The Human Scale

The Human Scale

Cathedrals of Culture - Part 1

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The Infinite Happiness

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Cathedrals of Culture - Part 2

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Trailer

The Human Scale

Symbols

Symbols

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