The Eyes of Orson Welles

  • April 5, 2019 / 19:00

Director: Mark Cousins
UK, 2018, 115’, color, b&w
English with Turkish subtitle

Documentarian Mark Cousins who dived deep into the tunnels of cinema in The Story of Film: An Odyssey picks another cinematic subject for his new film, this time exploring one of the lesser known sides of legendary director Orson Welles. Cousins takes the audience on an entertaining journey across the globe through the eyes of the maestro as he focuses on his little known past as a graphic artist, bringing to light a vast array of his hand drawings from comic strips to landscapes. Premiered at Cannes, The Eyes of Orson Welles not only offers a new and interesting perspective on Welles for his long-time fans, but also provides a nice entry point for those who will discover him for the first time.

The Eyes of Orson Welles

The Eyes of Orson Welles

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Goodbye

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Trailer

The Eyes of Orson Welles

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