Sh’Chur

  • November 14, 2018 / 19:00
  • November 23, 2018 / 20:00

Director: Shmuel Hasfari
Cast: Gila Almagor, Ronit Elkabetz, Eti Adar, Hanna Azoulay Hasfari
Israel, 1994, 98',  color
 Hebrew with Turkish subtitles

Sh’Chur portrays the colourful and passionate culture of the Moroccan community in Israel. It tells the story of 13-year-old Rachel, a thoroughly Westernized Sabra teenager who struggles to make sense of and come to terms with the white magic (Sh'Chur) practiced regularly by members of her family. This mystical world of spirits and demons takes on a physical presence in the shape of her elder sister Pnina, whose supernatural powers fill Rachel with fear...

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Sh’Chur

Sh’Chur

Late Marriage

Late Marriage

Or (My Treasure)

Or (My Treasure)

To Take a Wife

To Take a Wife

The Band's Visit

The Band's Visit

7 Days

7 Days

Jaffa

Jaffa

The Flood

The Flood

Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem

Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem

A Carriage and a Squat House  <br>Liliana Maresca

A Carriage and a Squat House
Liliana Maresca

Pera Museum, in collaboration with Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV), is one of the main venues for this year’s 15th Istanbul Biennial from 16 September to 12 November 2017. Through the biennial, we will be sharing detailed information about the artists and the artworks.

Face to Face

Face to Face

A firm believer in the idea that a collection needs to be upheld at least by four generations and comparing this continuity to a relay race, Nahit Kabakcı began creating the Huma Kabakcı Collection from the 1980s onwards. 

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Martín Zapater y Clavería, born in Zaragoza on November 12th 1747, came from a family of modest merchants and was taken in to live with a well-to-do aunt, Juana Faguás, and her daughter, Joaquina de Alduy. He studied with Goya in the Escuelas Pías school in Zaragoza from 1752 to 1757 and a friendship arose between them which was to last until the death of Zapater in 1803.