Roses à Crédit

  • November 23, 2013 / 14:00
  • December 1, 2013 / 18:00

Director: Amos Gitai
Cast:
 Léa Seydoux, Grégoire Leprince-Ringuet, Pierre Arditi, Arielle Dombasle, Catherine Jacob, Maud Wyler, Florence Thomassin, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, André Wilms
France; 113’, 2010, color
French with Turkish subtitles

The film mercilessly but sensitively dissects the materialist, post-war world of the French lower middle-class. It starts with a radio broadcast from the Second World War, a piece of official Vichy propaganda, and soon moves to stirring Resistance speeches of patriotic exhortation. This is the backdrop for a wedding between Daniel and Marjoline, a relationship that we follow over the following years as it waxes and wanes, mirroring in many ways the fortunes of France itself at this time. Marjoline, an attractive but somewhat empty-headed girl, soon turns into a consumer par-excellence, eagerly devouring magazines and ads, looking for exciting new clothes or appliances for her house. Daniel, on the other hand, is more of a dreamer, in love with the roses that were a family business and which he has inherited along with his patrimony. Gitaï proves extremely adept at following the emotional curves of this ill-fated marriage, as debt and credit begin to overwhelm the couple’s early romanticism. While everyday life plays out against a backdrop of post-war reconstruction and expansion, the ebb and flow of the relationship is beautifully circumscribed. Furthermore, the film is a paean to '50s décor, clothes and design; as immense efforts have been painstakingly made to assure total faithfulness to the era. But underneath the immaculate surface lies a potent message.

Esther

Esther

 Kippur

Kippur

Alila

Alila

News From Home - News From House

News From Home - News From House

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Roses à Crédit

Roses à Crédit

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